Chalk Pits

Chalk Pits Ranger, Joe Williams, addresses Parish Council Meeting

Posted on Wed, 29/11/2017 - 4:09pm

Keen to make sure that parishioners know all about the Local Nature Reserve and that they consider helping to keep it in good condition, Joe Williams spoke to a packed Parish Council meeting in November.

Joe explained that he is a relatively new ranger at the Queen Elizabeth Country Park but that he has got particular responsibility for the Buriton Chalk Pits.

He feels that it is a great addition to the Country Park and he praised the Parish Council for winning the substantial Lottery Grant which has helped to improve accessibility and awareness.

Chalk Pits Conservation Morning

Please come and help look after our Local Nature Reserve.

Buriton’s popular Chalk Pits Ranger, Joe Williams will be leading a short conservation task mornings from 9am to about 1pm on Saturday 10th March.

Please come along to the small quarry pit area (along the path from the old chalk wagon) – even if just for an hour or so. Tea, coffee and cake will be available as per usual!

Chalk Pits Conservation Morning

Please come and help look after our Local Nature Reserve.

Buriton’s popular Chalk Pits Ranger, Joe Williams will be leading a short conservation task mornings from 9am to about 1pm on Saturday 17th February.

Please come along to the small quarry pit area (along the path from the old chalk wagon) – even if just for an hour or so. Tea, coffee and cake will be available as per usual!

Chalk Pits Conservation Morning

Please come and help look after our Local Nature Reserve.

Buriton’s popular Chalk Pits Ranger, Joe Williams will be leading a short conservation task mornings from 9am to about 1pm on Saturday 27th January.

Please come along to the small quarry pit area (along the path from the old chalk wagon) – even if just for an hour or so. Tea, coffee and cake will be available as per usual!

Bats in the Chalk Pits

Posted on Sat, 11/11/2017 - 3:53pm

Ranger Joe finds bats in the pits

Buriton’s Chalk Pits Ranger, Joe Williams, led a popular evening walk in the Local Nature Reserve in October.

He explained that at this time of day, in fading light, another side of the Chalk Pits is revealed: tranquil yet alive with leaves rustling, foxes screeching and bats flitting to and fro. Most notably, he continued, is the rhythmic call of the Tawny Owl as it readies itself for night hunting.

Slow worms steal the show at Chalk Pits open morning

Posted on Tue, 20/06/2017 - 11:03am

Rangers from the Queen Elizabeth Country Park enthralled local families with insights into a wide range of plants, butterflies and creep-crawlies in the Nature Reserve.

There were scores of orchids growing in the small quarry bowl and local ranger Joe Williams was able to identify many other chalk-loving plants for all the visitors.

Joe, and colleague Steve Peach (Head Ranger at QECP), had also brought butterfly nets with them and everyone enjoyed catching a range of species and identifying them.

But the two gorgeous slow worms stole the show and, like all the other specimens, were released back into the wild at the end of the morning.

Blitz in the Pits

A morning in the Buriton Chalk Pits, with experts showing some of the wildlife that can be found.

As a follow-up to successful Bio-Blitz in previous years, Rangers from the Queen Elizabeth Country Park will be hosting a fun event in the Buriton Chalk Pits on Saturday 17th June: from 10.30am to 1.30pm.

Experts will show people the range of flowers and wildlife that can be found in and around the Chalk Pits Nature Reserve.

There are also plans to have a ‘sensory table’ with things like tree bark as well as food stuffs that can be made from plants such as jams etc.

BBC Countryfile visits Buriton

Posted on Fri, 24/02/2017 - 5:40pm

The BBC spent almost a full day in the parish on Thursday 16th February as part of a programme which is planned to be shown on Sunday March 5th.

The filming was part of a special feature about the Dark Night Skies of the South Downs National Park and Buriton was selected because of the quality of the darkness here.

The BBC team, with presenter Helen Skelton, spent much of the morning in the Chalk Pits Nature Reserve, discovering a range of night-flying moths that had been trapped overnight. As with many other species of nocturnal wildlife, light pollution from a range of sources can cause them to become disorientated, able to collect less food and threatening their chances of reproducing.